Hearing and vision problems often get in the way of a child’s education

Hearing and vision problems often get in the way of a child’s education

Ear infections and vision problems in Maasai children too often become more severe issues, resulting in hearing or visual impairment, because poverty levels are such that most Maasai families do not have the resources for (or, many times, even the access to) proper medical care.   Meet Shoke. Shoke is 11 years old, and was suffering from vision problems and longstanding untreated ear infections in both ears that had led to severe hearing impairments. Thanks to the generosity of a Coins for Change donor, Shoke has received glasses and has had a successful operation on one of his ears. Because he is now able to see and hear better, he has been able to start catching up in school and his test scores have already shown significant improvement! Unfortunately, Shoke still requires an operation for his other ear. Please help give him the gift of healthy hearing so that he can return to school and get the most out of his education, as he so dearly wants to do! Shoke must go all the way to Nairobi (four hours...
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New Coins for Change website launched!

New Coins for Change website launched!

You asked for a new website that helps you better understand the Maasai, the issues they face, what Coins for Change is doing to alleviate those issues, and the impact that these initiatives are having. Here it is. The new website has been designed to provide you with all of this, as well as providing regular updates on Coins for Change initiatives and allowing you to choose which program you would like to fund. We hope the new website answers all your questions and inspires you to help us in our mission to save the lives of poor, marginalized Maasai children in Amboseli, Kenya!...
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Get to know the Maasai

If the reality of the Maasai people seems distant to you, you’re not alone. Most people outside of Africa are unaware of the Maasai, their customs and traditions, and the challenges they face. The chances of your having met a Maasai are rather slim as well, unless of course you’ve travelled to Kenya or northern Tanzania, areas to which they are indigenous. However distant, the Maasai share many characteristics with us. They are resilient and hard working, they have strong beliefs, values and traditions, and they have a long history with periods of prosperity and others of accentuated hardship. They are warm, and welcoming, and curious about the world abroad. The Maasai culture is steeped in tradition, dating back for many centuries. Strongly patriarchal in nature, the men are responsible for the safety of the village, developing and improving the community’s cattle stock through trades and bartering, and making all relevant political decisions. Women are responsible for all matters regarding the home,...
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Alleviating poverty

Most Maasai live in extreme poverty, on $0.35 a day. The International Poverty Line, as defined by the World Bank, is at $1.90 per person per day. 90% of the Maasai people’s livestock were killed by starvation in 2009 when a severe drought hit the Amboseli region of Kenya. The Maasai maintain a traditional pastoral lifestyle, depending on their livestock for nutrition and source of income. Milk, in fact, is their most important source of nutrition, as their staple diet consists of milk and maize. Because of their reduced livestock, Maasai families and children are almost always hungry now. Some children eat only one meal a day, and most just two meals a day.   In 2009, Coins for Change identified a new breed of goat, the Galla goat, that produces 4 cups of milk per day, which is 4x as much milk as the traditional East African goat. 18 Galla goats were purchased in Somalia and brought to the Maasai to see if...
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What makes us Different

Coins for Change has a Maasai Advisory Board that helps direct our efforts and maximize the impact of our projects and donations Coins for Change established and maintains a very strong relationship and open dialogue with Maasai chiefs in the Amboseli region of Kenya. It is through this close connection to the Maasai people that Coins for Change has seen, up close, the key issues perpetuating this vicious cycle and has been able to develop targeted and effective projects to address them. The collaboration with the Maasai chiefs and people is such that Coins for Change actually has three Maasai chiefs, two Maasai elders and one Maasai Midwife on their Advisory Board. In fact, the first and only Maasai woman chief in all of Kenya, Chief Mary Kahingo, sits on the Advisory Board of Coins for Change. No less important is the fact that all Coins for Change volunteers are locals and members of the Maasai tribe.   Coins for Change donors can see the...
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Vision and Mission

  Our Vision A world in which every Maasai child has the freedom and opportunity to create a better future for themselves.   Our Mission To save the lives of poor, marginalized Maasai children in Amboseli, Kenya, by putting an end to FGM and early marriage and providing the children with the education, resources and freedom to make a better future for themselves....
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