Saved from forced Early Marriage

Saved from forced Early Marriage

Saved from Forced Early Marriage Lucy and Lydia are sisters. They lost their parents when they were still very young. Then they were separated; Lucy (the eldest) sent to live with a distant uncle in Kenya, and Lydia left with neighbors in Tanzania who had little interest in the child. Lucy was allowed to enroll in public school and was doing well. Her uncle, however, didn't see the value in her education and decided to marry her off. She ran away to avoid female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, and appealed to her school's head teacher to help her.  Her school teachers all came together to protect Lucy, helping her finish her primary school years by housing her and contributing to cover school costs. When she graduated, they continued to house her and managed to enroll her in secondary school under special circumstances. Eventually, however, those special circumstances came to an end and the teachers could no longer cover her tuition...
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School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage

School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage

School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage For Maasai girls, school holidays often carry a higher risk of being forced to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage. They go home from their schools for the holidays, and there is sufficient time to have them undergo and recover from the procedure before classes resume. Help protect Maasai girls from forced FGM and early marriage. Allow them to continue being girls a while longer. Many Maasai girls are forced to undergo FGM by the age of 13 and quickly become mothers themselves. Rescuing them from forced FGM and early marriage helps these girls avoid the potentially severe health-related complications of FGM, reduces infant mortality rates, allows the girls to benefit from more education, and helps them build a better life for themselves and eventually their own children. You can make a real difference. Please donate today and help give these girls a brighter future. SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave ...
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A new calf brings much needed additional nutrition and income

A new calf brings much needed additional nutrition and income

New calf brings much needed nutrition and income In the midst of one of the worst droughts in years, a new calf is born at the Coins for Change Gregoire SafeHouse!   This calf will bring much needed nutrition and income to the SafeHouse, allowing more children and women to be protected until their domestic issues are resolved with the help of Chief Mary and they can return to their homes in safety. Girls and women come to the SafeHouse in search of a safe harbor, escaping from terrible conditions like domestic abuse, forced female genital mutilation (#FGM) and forced early marriage. Sincere thanks to all Coins for Change donors, who make incredible gifts like this possible. You give the Maasai opportunities for a better now and a better future! SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave...
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Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye

Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye

Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye. Naishorua is one of the young Maasai girls in standard three at Osoit Elementary School, a public school in Kenya. Public schools in Kenya typically aren’t well equipped to serve vision or hearing impaired children. These children often start falling behind on their learning and studies, and eventually drop out of school. Going blind in one eye, Naishorua needs an operation to save her sight. The operation only costs $421, but medical care like this is not an option for poor rural Maasai families. The money to pay for the trip to and from the hospital in Nairobi is a hardship, yet this family has managed to raise the money for the transportation as well as an additional $63. Please consider donating so that we may provide the funding for the surgery Naishorua desperately needs to...
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Meet Naboye, forced to flee her home to save herself from FGM and early marriage

Meet Naboye, forced to flee her home to save herself from FGM and early marriage

Meet Naboye, who was forced to flee from her home with her mother to save herself from female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage. Naboye, one of eight siblings, grew up like so many other Maasai girls, a victim and prisoner of extreme poverty and tradition. She was able to go to school for a brief period of time and showed herself to be hardworking and determined, but she missed too many school days in order to fulfill her obligations at home, and eventually dropped out of school. Her elder brother, tasked with providing for the family after they lost their father fifteen years ago, decided to have Naboye undergo FGM and sell her into early marriage. To save herself, Naboye fled with her mother to the Coins for Change SafeHouse, where they have been under the care of Chief Mary ever since. Now, with the generosity of a Coins for Change donor, Naboye is being given a chance at a better life....
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Understand the Issues

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) violates a girl's human rights. It also breaks Kenyan law. Female genital mutilation (FGM) has been illegal for girls under 18 in Kenya since 2002, when the Children’s Act came into force, and for everyone since 2011, when the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act 2011 came into force. Yet almost 90% of Maasai girls undergo female genital mutilation (FGM). Every day, Maasai girls are forced into FGM and early marriage. It is a heartbreaking reality, a vicious cycle that perpetuates itself generation after generation because of extreme poverty, tradition and perceived gender roles that severely limit the Maasai girl's likelihood of getting an education. Child Marriage (also known as Early Marriage) is yet another violation of  girls' rights. In 2014, Kenya passed The Marriage Act, which forbids girls being married before the age of 18. Child marriage (or early marriage) therefore violates a girls' rights in Kenya. Despite the fact that this laws now exists, many male Maasai government...
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Alleviating poverty

Most Maasai live in extreme poverty, on $0.35 a day. The International Poverty Line, as defined by the World Bank, is at $1.90 per person per day. The consequences of extreme poverty? HUNGER: 90% of the Maasai people’s livestock were killed by starvation in 2009 when a severe drought hit the Amboseli region of Kenya. The Maasai maintain a traditional pastoral lifestyle, depending on their livestock for nutrition and source of income. Because of their reduced livestock, Maasai families and children are almost always hungry now. Many children eat only one meal a day. EDUCATION: Extreme poverty also limits parents' ability to send their children to school. Although Kenya provides free primary public schools, parents still need to cover the costs of school uniforms and supplies. This is out of reach for most Maasai families. Lack of education then reinforces the vicious cycle of poverty and sustains harmful practices like female genital mutilation (FGM), as men and women remain uninformed about its true risks...
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Sponsoring Girls’ Education

School enrollment amongst the Maasai is very low Free primary public schools were introduced in Kenya in 2003 and have had a significant impact on school enrollment at the national level. Amongst the Maasai, however, school enrollment remains low. Less than 20% of Maasai girls enroll in school. Of those who do, less than one in five finish primary school, significantly less go to secondary school, and only a very few make it to university. This drop out rate is exacerbated by the fact that there are no public secondary schools, and private schools are prohibitively expensive for most Maasai families. But why are enrollment rates so low to begin with? And why are drop out rates in primary school so high? 1. Economic Costs: Private boarding schools are prohibitively expensive for most Maasai families. Public elementary schools in Kenya don’t charge tuition fees, but do require families to provide school uniforms for their children. Even this cost can be prohibitive for the Maasai,...
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Vision and Mission

Our VISION A world in which every Maasai child has the freedom and opportunity to create a better future for themselves.   Our MISSION To rescue poor, marginalized Maasai children in Amboseli, Kenya, by putting an end to female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage and providing the children with the education, resources and freedom to make a better future for themselves.   Our APPROACH We are committed to putting an end to female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, but understand that we must work with the Maasai community to effect lasting change. We therefore collaborate closely with the Maasai to generate solutions that are impactful in the short term and create lasting positive change in the long term. We encourage them to preserve their culture and their traditions, but to see the harm in practices like female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, and the social and economic benefits of abandoning them. SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave ...
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Our Work

To rescue Maasai girls from female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, we need to address the three root causes that sustain and drive these harmful practices: extreme poverty, lack of opportunity to get an education, and traditional social norms.   We Have a Solution. And it works. We focus on effective, sustainable programs that produce immediate and long term mission-critical impact. We tackle the three key root causes of female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage. We work closely with the Maasai community and have a local advisory board constituted entirely by Maasai. By tackling the root causes of female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage with solutions that address long term needs while acknowledging immediate critical needs, and by working closely with the Maasai community, we can bring an end to FGM and early marriage, and give Maasai girls real hope and opportunities for a better future. Our Programs Become a part of something bigger! Help give Maasai girls the opportunity and freedom to gain...
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