The Safe House, a safe harbor for women and children in danger

The Safe House, a safe harbor for women and children in danger

When Maasai girls and women in the Amboseli region of Kenya feel endangered, they go to Chief Mary Kahingo. Given the number of women and girls who come seeking her help and protection, however, there is insufficient space in Chief Mary's home to accommodate them all. Coins for Change therefore built a Safe House next door to house these women and girls and provide them with a safe harbor until the dangers they face have been mitigated and they can safely return to their homes. Below are photographs of women and their children in the safe house. There are three women so far and four children whose cases are pending in court, awaiting rulings. Their cases are all similar. All three women have been subjected to domestic violence, been beaten, mistreated and neglected. ...
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What are the traditional roles of men and women in Maasai Culture?

What are the traditional roles of men and women in Maasai Culture?

The Maasai are a strongly patriarchal society. A boy's or man's age determines the role he is to play. Every 15 years, a new generation of warriors (called Morans, or Il-moran) is initiated, including all boys 12-25 years old who have reached puberty and who did not join the previous generation of warriors. Becoming a warrior is a matter of honor and responsibility, and boys undergo several rites of passage to achieve it. One such rite of passage is the emorata, a circumcision performed without anesthetic. The boy must endure the operation in silence (as expressions of pain can bring temporary dishonor upon him) and upon completion is considered a junior warrior. The healing process takes three to four months, and the junior warrior wears black clothes and lives in a separate village, called a manyatta, for four to eight months after the ceremony. The manyatta has no circular fence protecting it, emphasizing the role the warrior will play in protecting the community. During this time, junior warriors go through several rites of...
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New Coins for Change website launched!

New Coins for Change website launched!

You asked for a new website that helps you better understand the Maasai, the issues they face, what Coins for Change is doing to alleviate those issues, and the impact that these initiatives are having. Here it is. The new website has been designed to provide you with all of this, as well as providing regular updates on Coins for Change initiatives and allowing you to choose which program you would like to fund. We hope the new website answers all your questions and inspires you to help us in our mission to save the lives of poor, marginalized Maasai children in Amboseli, Kenya!...
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Sponsoring Children’s Education

An education is often a luxury that families can not afford The Maasai maintain a traditional pastoral lifestyle, depending on their livestock for nutrition and as a source of income to help pay for expenses such as their children’s education. The severe drought of 2009 killed 90% of their livestock, and there are now many children who cannot attend school because their parents just don’t have the money. Most Amboseli Maasai live on 35c a day. State supported schools do exist, but in Amboseli, Kenya they are usually low performing schools with class sizes of around 60 to 80 students, very few books and no computers. Quality boarding schools, on the other hand, provide children with a good education, giving them the knowledge and skills to foster more prosperous futures for themselves, their families and their communities. But at an annual cost of $500, they are out of reach for most Maasai families.   Being sponsored to a boarding school can save a Maasai...
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Real Impact. Real Change.

With your generous donations, we have been able to touch and protect the lives of many Maasai children, women and families in Amboseli, Kenya. Thank you. We couldn't have achieved this without you! Over 1,000 galla goats have been donated... ... providing families and bomas (Maasai villages) with the means to combat poverty and hunger in a sustainable manner. Read more Six bomas (Maasai villages) have been adopted... ... providing them with the cows and goats necessary to sustain and nourish them, and helping to pay school fees for village children. Read more 48 children have been sponsored into quality boarding schools... ... improving their prospects for the future and protecting the girls from FGM and early marriage. Read more 2 teacher houses have been built and $2,500 provided for school books... ... to the local village school, enabling the school to provide a better quality education for the children. Read more A Safe House has been built... ... providing women and girls in peril with a...
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Vision and Mission

  Our Vision A world in which every Maasai child has the freedom and opportunity to create a better future for themselves.   Our Mission To save the lives of poor, marginalized Maasai children in Amboseli, Kenya, by putting an end to FGM and early marriage and providing the children with the education, resources and freedom to make a better future for themselves....
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Our Work

Coins for Change has five donation-based focus areas, all of which address the key issues identified with our Maasai Advisory Board. Sponsoring Children’s Education. Being sponsored into a quality boarding school helps protect Maasai girls from forced FGM and early marriage, and provides them with three meals a day and a good education. These girls tend to marry later in life and foster healthier and more prosperous conditions for their families and communities. Read more. Alleviating poverty. In 2009, Kenya had a severe drought that killed 90% of the Maasai’s livestock. Most Amboseli Maasai now live on 35c a day. Donating a goat to a family gives them a sustainable source of nutrition and income, as the goat’s milk can be consumed or exchanged for other much-needed items. Read more.   Building a Safe House. When Maasai girls and women are endangered in Amboseli, Kenya, they run to Chief Mary Kahingo. The Safe House is being built next to Chief Mary’s home and will protect the women and girls until the courts...
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About Us

Coins for Change Coins for Change is a 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit organization whose mission it is to save the lives and futures of poor, marginalized Maasai children in the Amboseli region of Kenya, by putting an end to female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage and providing the children with the education, resources and freedom to make a better future for themselves. Our main emphasis is on protecting Maasai girls who are being forced into early marriage and FGM. Focusing solely on this issue, however, helps a child in the short run, but does nothing to address the underlying causes of the issue. The current reality is a vicious cycle that perpetuates itself generation after generation because of tradition, perceived gender roles and poverty.     Real Lives. Real Impact. Real Change. In order to make a real impact and drive real change, therefore, Coins for Change focuses on projects that address the issue of FGM and early marriage as well as its root causes. We sponsor Maasai boys and girls into quality boarding schools where...
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