1 in 5 girls worldwide become child brides, married before the age of 18.

1 in 5 girls worldwide become child brides, married before the age of 18.

It is estimated that 1 in 5 girls worldwide become child brides, married before the age of 18. Coins for Change is committed to rescuing Maasai girls from being forced into female genital mutilation (FGM) and into becoming child brides, and providing them with the education, resources and freedom to make a better future for themselves, their families and their communities. Real Lives. Real Impact. Real Change. Child marriage is against the law in Kenya. Despite this, it is estimated that over 90% of Maasai girls go through female genital mutilation (FGM) between the ages of 11 and 14, and are shortly thereafter married as child brides. Why Maasai girls marry at such an early age. Economic Incentives A daughter’s marriage increases her parent’s wealth through the dowry they receive and by relieving them of the cost of supporting her. Fear of Early Pregnancy Traditional practices make Maasai girls highly vulnerable to becoming pregnant, and premarital pregnancy brings disgrace and a reduced dowry. Social Pressure There is much-perceived honor in becoming a woman, marrying...
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Chief Mary has changed the lives of countless Maasai girls

Chief Mary has changed the lives of countless Maasai girls

Chief Mary has changed the lives of countless Maasai girls. Chief Mary Kahingo, the only female Maasai Chief in all of Kenya, has a vision to fight for the rights and opportunities of Maasai girls and women - and this is what drives her every day. Her journey started when she was still in school. She was one of the fortunate few Maasai girls who was able to get an education. Chief Mary grew up surrounded by the severe gender inequality that Maasai girls face, witnessing the harmful social practices that limit these girls' opportunities, and became a firm believer in the social and economic value of empowering women.   "I am the only Maasai Woman chief in all of Kenya. I am encouraging others who went to school to join me to fight for our rights."   Chief Mary became increasingly active in fighting for girls' rights. Thanks to her incredible strength, commitment to her vision, and resilience and courage in the face of opposition, she is now an example of what Maasai girls...
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3 million girls are at risk of undergoing FGM every year, worldwide.

3 million girls are at risk of undergoing FGM every year, worldwide.

3 million girls are at risk of undergoing FGM every year, worldwide. Female genital mutilation (FGM) violates a girl's human rights. It also breaks Kenyan law. And yet, over 90% of Maasai girls will undergo FGM between the ages of 11 and 14.   What is FGM? Female circumcision, or female genital mutilation (FGM), is traditionally a crucial part of the Maasai girl’s rite of passage to womanhood.Maasai girls typically celebrate their rite of passage between the ages of 11 and 14. A traditional female circumciser performs the FGM procedure, and a paste made from cow dung and milk fat is then applied to the cut to stop the bleeding.Immediate risks include severe bleeding, infection, HIV transmission and death. Long-term effects include chronic infections of the reproductive parts, pain during sexual intercourse, and difficulties in childbirth that can lead to stillbirths.   Let's put an end to this.   Naboye had to run away from home to escape FGM. Naboye grew up like so many Maasai girls, a victim and prisoner of...
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Saved from forced Early Marriage

Saved from forced Early Marriage

Saved from Forced Early Marriage Lucy and Lydia are sisters. They lost their parents when they were still very young. Then they were separated; Lucy (the eldest) sent to live with a distant uncle in Kenya, and Lydia left with neighbors in Tanzania who had little interest in the child. Lucy was allowed to enroll in public school and was doing well. Her uncle, however, didn't see the value in her education and decided to marry her off. She ran away to avoid female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, and appealed to her school's head teacher to help her.  Her school teachers all came together to protect Lucy, helping her finish her primary school years by housing her and contributing to cover school costs. When she graduated, they continued to house her and managed to enroll her in secondary school under special circumstances. Eventually, however, those special circumstances came to an end and the teachers could no longer cover her tuition...
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School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage

School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage

School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage For Maasai girls, school holidays often carry a higher risk of being forced to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage. They go home from their schools for the holidays, and there is sufficient time to have them undergo and recover from the procedure before classes resume. Help protect Maasai girls from forced FGM and early marriage. Allow them to continue being girls a while longer. Many Maasai girls are forced to undergo FGM by the age of 13 and quickly become mothers themselves. Rescuing them from forced FGM and early marriage helps these girls avoid the potentially severe health-related complications of FGM, reduces infant mortality rates, allows the girls to benefit from more education, and helps them build a better life for themselves and eventually their own children. You can make a real difference. Please donate today and help give these girls a brighter future. SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave ...
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A new calf brings much needed additional nutrition and income

A new calf brings much needed additional nutrition and income

New calf brings much needed nutrition and income In the midst of one of the worst droughts in years, a new calf is born at the Coins for Change Gregoire SafeHouse!   This calf will bring much needed nutrition and income to the SafeHouse, allowing more children and women to be protected until their domestic issues are resolved with the help of Chief Mary and they can return to their homes in safety. Girls and women come to the SafeHouse in search of a safe harbor, escaping from terrible conditions like domestic abuse, forced female genital mutilation (#FGM) and forced early marriage. Sincere thanks to all Coins for Change donors, who make incredible gifts like this possible. You give the Maasai opportunities for a better now and a better future! SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave...
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5 Things Nonprofits should Learn from Effective Disaster Relief Efforts

5 Things Nonprofits should Learn from Effective Disaster Relief Efforts

Disaster relief efforts are designed to be immediate, focused and effective. People in dire need of help can’t afford to wait for bureaucratic organizations to set up relief teams or to have scarce resources misallocated to things which are neither urgent nor of the greatest importance. They need immediate help in specific areas, or things will get worse. Nonprofits that focus on longer term issues (such as food security, poverty alleviation, human rights, or economic development) can learn important lessons from observing disaster relief efforts and should apply these to how they organize themselves and operate in the field. The objective is ultimately the same: to have as much positive impact as possible given the resources available.   Five things nonprofits should learn from effective disaster relief efforts: 1. Understand the Issue Get a quick, firm grasp of the issue(s). Bring in people who are very close to the issue(s), as well as people who have different backgrounds and can raise considerations you might otherwise...
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Kenya is suffering one of the most severe, protracted droughts in over a decade. Join us in bringing much-needed relief to the Maasai.

Kenya is suffering one of the most severe, protracted droughts in over a decade. Join us in bringing much-needed relief to the Maasai.

Kenya is suffering one of the most severe, protracted droughts in over a decade. To the Maasai, this means their livestock is dying, their fragile crops are failing, and their water supply is vanishing as waterholes and rivers dry up. With no livestock left, Maasai herders are left with no means of buying food or paying school fees. Maasai women and girls are forced to walk for hours to fetch water for their families and livestock. The Kenyan government has declared a state of emergency, saying millions of Kenyans may face hunger and starvation. Donations made to Coins for Change are helping to bring some relief to the Maasai. A water well has been built next to Coins for Change's Gregoire Safe House. It provides women and children seeking refuge at the safe house with water as well as a sustainable food supply from land which can now be harvested and milk from livestock which can now survive the drought. Many Maasai...
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Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye

Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye

Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye. Naishorua is one of the young Maasai girls in standard three at Osoit Elementary School, a public school in Kenya. Public schools in Kenya typically aren’t well equipped to serve vision or hearing impaired children. These children often start falling behind on their learning and studies, and eventually drop out of school. Going blind in one eye, Naishorua needs an operation to save her sight. The operation only costs $421, but medical care like this is not an option for poor rural Maasai families. The money to pay for the trip to and from the hospital in Nairobi is a hardship, yet this family has managed to raise the money for the transportation as well as an additional $63. Please consider donating so that we may provide the funding for the surgery Naishorua desperately needs to...
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