Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye

Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye

Meet Naishorua, a young girl who’s dreams of receiving an education are being put at risk by the fact that she is going blind in one eye. Naishorua is one of the young Maasai girls in standard three at Osoit Elementary School, a public school in Kenya. Public schools in Kenya typically aren’t well equipped to serve vision or hearing impaired children. These children often start falling behind on their learning and studies, and eventually drop out of school. Going blind in one eye, Naishorua needs an operation to save her sight. The operation only costs $421, but medical care like this is not an option for poor rural Maasai families. The money to pay for the trip to and from the hospital in Nairobi is a hardship, yet this family has managed to raise the money for the transportation as well as an additional $63. Please consider donating so that we may provide the funding for the surgery Naishorua desperately needs to...
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Meet Naboye, forced to flee her home to save herself from FGM and early marriage

Meet Naboye, forced to flee her home to save herself from FGM and early marriage

Meet Naboye, who was forced to flee from her home with her mother to save herself from female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage. Naboye, one of eight siblings, grew up like so many other Maasai girls, a victim and prisoner of extreme poverty and tradition. She was able to go to school for a brief period of time and showed herself to be hardworking and determined, but she missed too many school days in order to fulfill her obligations at home, and eventually dropped out of school. Her elder brother, tasked with providing for the family after they lost their father fifteen years ago, decided to have Naboye undergo FGM and sell her into early marriage. To save herself, Naboye fled with her mother to the Coins for Change SafeHouse, where they have been under the care of Chief Mary ever since. Now, with the generosity of a Coins for Change donor, Naboye is being given a chance at a better life....
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Hearing and vision problems often get in the way of a child’s education

Hearing and vision problems often get in the way of a child’s education

Ear infections and vision problems in Maasai children too often become more severe issues, resulting in hearing or visual impairment, because poverty levels are such that most Maasai families do not have the resources for (or, many times, even the access to) proper medical care.   Meet Shoke. Shoke is 11 years old, and was suffering from vision problems and longstanding untreated ear infections in both ears that had led to severe hearing impairments. Thanks to the generosity of a Coins for Change donor, Shoke has received glasses and has had a successful operation on one of his ears. Because he is now able to see and hear better, he has been able to start catching up in school and his test scores have already shown significant improvement! Unfortunately, Shoke still requires an operation for his other ear. Please help give him the gift of healthy hearing so that he can return to school and get the most out of his education, as he so dearly wants to do! Shoke must go all the way to Nairobi (four hours...
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The Safe House, a safe harbor for women and children in danger

The Safe House, a safe harbor for women and children in danger

When Maasai girls and women in the Amboseli region of Kenya feel endangered, they go to Chief Mary Kahingo. Given the number of women and girls who come seeking her help and protection, however, there is insufficient space in Chief Mary's home to accommodate them all. Coins for Change therefore built a Safe House next door to house these women and girls and provide them with a safe harbor until the dangers they face have been mitigated and they can safely return to their homes. Below are photographs of women and their children in the safe house. There are three women so far and four children whose cases are pending in court, awaiting rulings. Their cases are all similar. All three women have been subjected to domestic violence, been beaten, mistreated and neglected. ...
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What are the traditional roles of men and women in Maasai Culture?

What are the traditional roles of men and women in Maasai Culture?

The Maasai are a strongly patriarchal society. A boy's or man's age determines the role he is to play. Every 15 years, a new generation of warriors (called Morans, or Il-moran) is initiated, including all boys 12-25 years old who have reached puberty and who did not join the previous generation of warriors. Becoming a warrior is a matter of honor and responsibility, and boys undergo several rites of passage to achieve it. One such rite of passage is the emorata, a circumcision performed without anesthetic. The boy must endure the operation in silence (as expressions of pain can bring temporary dishonor upon him) and upon completion is considered a junior warrior. The healing process takes three to four months, and the junior warrior wears black clothes and lives in a separate village, called a manyatta, for four to eight months after the ceremony. The manyatta has no circular fence protecting it, emphasizing the role the warrior will play in protecting the community. During this time, junior warriors go through several rites of...
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Binghamton University Run with the Goats

Binghamton University Run with the Goats

For the past five years a group of students at Binghamton University, New York, has been raising money to donate goats to the Maasai through Coins for Change. They organize an annual run called “Running with the Goats”. Participants pay a fee to join the run and have the opportunity to  purchase handcrafted Maasai jewelry at the event. All proceeds go to donating goats to the Maasai!   If you would like to sponsor a similar event at your school or university, please do reach out to us! We can provide you with with information about other fundraising events, and provide you with visuals and information that you can print and use at your own event....
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New Coins for Change website launched!

New Coins for Change website launched!

You asked for a new website that helps you better understand the Maasai, the issues they face, what Coins for Change is doing to alleviate those issues, and the impact that these initiatives are having. Here it is. The new website has been designed to provide you with all of this, as well as providing regular updates on Coins for Change initiatives and allowing you to choose which program you would like to fund. We hope the new website answers all your questions and inspires you to help us in our mission to save the lives of poor, marginalized Maasai children in Amboseli, Kenya!...
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