The hopes, freedom and futures of Maasai girls are being robbed and sacrificed every day. And it needs to stop.

The hopes, freedom and futures of Maasai girls are being robbed and sacrificed every day. And it needs to stop.

The hopes, freedom and futures of Maasai girls are being robbed and sacrificed every day. And it needs to stop. Every day, Maasai girls are forced into female genital mutilation (FGM) and child marriage. What does this mean for Maasai girls? It means they will likely have health issues resulting from FGM, which can range from potentially grave severe bleeding, to chronic infections and fatal difficulties in childbirth. It also means that 11- to 14-year-old Maasai girls will have to leave school, instead bearing children for their new husbands and dedicating themselves to their new home and family. Maasai girls are largely condemned to living a life of extreme poverty and hard work, with little hope of a better future. Click here to learn more about the issues.   Coins for Change is committed to putting an end to FGM and early marriage and to providing poor marginalized Maasai girls with the education, resources and freedom to make a better future for themselves, their families and their communities. What makes Coins...
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3 million girls are at risk of undergoing FGM every year, worldwide.

3 million girls are at risk of undergoing FGM every year, worldwide.

3 million girls are at risk of undergoing FGM every year, worldwide. Female genital mutilation (FGM) violates a girl's human rights. It also breaks Kenyan law. And yet, over 90% of Maasai girls will undergo FGM between the ages of 11 and 14.   What is FGM? Female circumcision, or female genital mutilation (FGM), is traditionally a crucial part of the Maasai girl’s rite of passage to womanhood.Maasai girls typically celebrate their rite of passage between the ages of 11 and 14. A traditional female circumciser performs the FGM procedure, and a paste made from cow dung and milk fat is then applied to the cut to stop the bleeding.Immediate risks include severe bleeding, infection, HIV transmission and death. Long-term effects include chronic infections of the reproductive parts, pain during sexual intercourse, and difficulties in childbirth that can lead to stillbirths.   Let's put an end to this.   Naboye had to run away from home to escape FGM. Naboye grew up like so many Maasai girls, a victim and prisoner of...
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School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage

School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage

School holidays, a peak season for female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage For Maasai girls, school holidays often carry a higher risk of being forced to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage. They go home from their schools for the holidays, and there is sufficient time to have them undergo and recover from the procedure before classes resume. Help protect Maasai girls from forced FGM and early marriage. Allow them to continue being girls a while longer. Many Maasai girls are forced to undergo FGM by the age of 13 and quickly become mothers themselves. Rescuing them from forced FGM and early marriage helps these girls avoid the potentially severe health-related complications of FGM, reduces infant mortality rates, allows the girls to benefit from more education, and helps them build a better life for themselves and eventually their own children. You can make a real difference. Please donate today and help give these girls a brighter future. SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave ...
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Understand the Issues

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) violates a girl's human rights. It also breaks Kenyan law. Female genital mutilation (FGM) has been illegal for girls under 18 in Kenya since 2002, when the Children’s Act came into force, and for everyone since 2011, when the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act 2011 came into force. Yet almost 90% of Maasai girls undergo female genital mutilation (FGM). Every day, Maasai girls are forced into FGM and early marriage. It is a heartbreaking reality, a vicious cycle that perpetuates itself generation after generation because of extreme poverty, tradition and perceived gender roles that severely limit the Maasai girl's likelihood of getting an education. Child Marriage (also known as Early Marriage) is yet another violation of  girls' rights. In 2014, Kenya passed The Marriage Act, which forbids girls being married before the age of 18. Child marriage (or early marriage) therefore violates a girls' rights in Kenya. Despite the fact that this laws now exists, many male Maasai government...
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